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Finding the right remote job for you

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The remote job game plan

Within the tech industry, remote work is increasingly becoming the new normal. According to a 2019 Zapier report, 95% of U.S. knowledge workers want to work remotely and 74% would be willing to quit a job to do so.

The question used to be "Is remote right for you?". COVID-19 answered that question on our behalf. Now, the question isn't so much whether remote work is right for you, but what flavor is right.

Remote jobs aren't all created equal

Remote jobs aren't all the same, so it's important to assess different opportunities to determine which might be the perfect fit for you.

Consider how much stability you're seeking: There are a lot of different ways to work remotely. Looking for stability and opportunities for growth? Then a full-time position might be your best bet. But if you're looking for flexibility and freedom (beyond location), a contract or freelance position might be a better option.

Think about when you want to be working: You can look for companies that keep traditional work hours in your time zone if that's what works best for you. You can also find a company that's super flexible and will let you work anytime, anywhere.

Think about what kind of remote culture you want: Every company does it differently. Some companies have a mostly in-person team with a few remote employees. Others are 100 percent remote. Some companies have you work remotely not too far from the office and show up in person several days a month. Others may have you thousands of miles away, never setting foot in an office.

Understand what remote employers are looking for

When you're applying for a remote job, you need to understand what sets you apart as the perfect remote candidate and figure out exactly how to frame those characteristics to potential employers. Some in-demand qualifications:

You're tech-savvy: Employers with remote staff rely heavily on the latest tools and software to get the job done, such as video conferencing apps. Some companies will pay to get you set up with the gear you need, but others won't. In any case, be prepared to gain experience with new tools.

You're an efficient communicator: You'll primarily communicate via messaging apps, email, and texts, so it is essential to be able to get your point across clearly and quickly.

You're independent and trustworthy: As a remote worker, you'll probably have the least amount of supervision you've experienced in your career. You'll have to take ownership of your tasks and be proactive and self-motivated in getting them completed on time. If you have previous experience freelancing or running your own business, you've got a leg up on the competition.

You're a great fit for that particular role and the company values: In addition to a high value fit, you should also have skill and experience in the role as well as an understanding and love for the product. Before you apply for a remote job, make sure you're familiar with the company.
Start exploring remote jobs

More from Today in Tech

Need proof that now is as good a time as ever to launch your business? Take a look at these massive companies born out of recessions.
 
  • Thomas Edison launched General Electric right as the nation was heading into the Panic of 1893, a period of 16 months where business activity dropped nearly 40% across the nation. Nevertheless, the company persisted and went on to be one of the original 12 companies listed on the Dow Jones Industrial Average in 1896, where it remained for over a century.
  • During the recession of 1937–1938, William Hewlett and David Packard decided to formulate a plan for their new electronics company, Hewlett-Packard. Still feeling the sting of the recession, the duo incorporated their business on January 1, 1939, and would go on to build one of the worldwide powerhouses in computers.
  • FedEx Founder Fred Smith launched the business right on the tail end of the Recession of 1969–1970. Yet he was able to overcome the challenge and would go on to pioneer industry and grow a business that in 2019 delivered over 6 million packages a day.

 
 
As the COVID-19 outbreak worsens across the US, the urgent need for medical gear has compelled the 3D printing industry to put their tools to work in entirely new ways.
  • Boston-based Formlabs is working to supply hospitals with 3D-printed COVID-19 test swabs. Formlabs has organized the deployment of nearly 1,000 printers to mass-produce the swabs quickly.
  • 3D printing company Stratasys says it's mobilizing all of its resources to quickly produce thousands of disposable face shields. These will be provided to medical personnel for free.
  • HP is mobilizing to produce a variety of 3D-printed components for medical facilities across the globe. So far, the company has helped deliver more than 1,000 3D-printed parts to local hospitals.
  • Ford Motor Company is partnering with GE Healthcare to expand the production of ventilators and other critical equipment in the US. Ford also plans to assemble more than 100,000 face shields per week.
  • Volkswagen has formed a task force responsible for adapting its manufacturing facilities for the production of ventilators and medical gear. Part of that effort includes leveraging its more than 125 industrial 3D printers.

In the face of a global pandemic and a financial meltdown, founders are confronted with a new reality. Pete Flint shares three distinct but equally critical elements of how you manage a crisis:
 

  • The first is managing losses. This will be the most painful and challenging thing you do as a CEO because it involves people, but it's often not so much about the what as it is the how. Your empathy and speed are key here.
  • The second is gaining ground. These are the ways you will reorient your focus, your tactics, and your team, so you come out ahead after a crisis.
  • The third is managing psychology. It is crucial you keep yourself, your team, and those around you healthy, sane, and productive.

David Hassell scaled 15Five to over 200 remote employees over the past nine years. He shares his thoughts on how you can use this extended period of forced remote work to reshape your company for the better.

 
With such a sudden shift from offline to online, how can we keep our communities connected and engaged? From online conferences to intimate virtual networking experiences, David Spinks shares five principles for startups scrambling to ramp up virtual community building efforts quickly.
 
  • Don't be afraid to swing for the fences.
  • You're growing a tree, not building a house.
  • Focus on first principles instead of exporting your offline event strategy.
  • Set dual goals to stay authentic.
  • Measure, measure, measure.

Hot startups hiring now 🔥

DataGrail - Taking the complicated out of compliance. Explore 2 jobs.
Modern Health - Mental health benefits platform for employers. Explore 19 jobs.
BehaveHealth - All-in-one software platform for behavioral health treatment centers. Hiring engineers.
TradeWing - Amplifying the impact and value of trade and professional associations. Explore 4 jobs.

Funding and Acquisitions

Apple has purchased the highly popular iOS app Dark Sky. Apple's current weather app relies on data from The Weather Channel, owned by IBM. With Dark Sky's proprietary data, Apple could build a more accurate and useful version of its own weather app.
OfferUp announced a 120 million funding round and an agreement to acquire Letgo, a rival commerce app that also lets people buy and sell used goods. Together, the new entity will have more than 20 million monthly active users across the U.S.
Palo Alto Networks announced that it plans to acquire CloudGenix for $420 million. CloudGenix competes with Cisco and other incumbents in the software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN) space, targeting large enterprises that need to manage network traffic at branch offices.
Meetup, the social networking platform designed to connect people in person, is being spun out of WeWork. The site is being sold to AlleyCorp and other private investors for an undisclosed sum. Meetup serves 49 million members and more than 230,000 organizers who create an average of 15,000 in-person events per day.
Via, a transportation software company best-known for its carpool service in New York City, has raised $200 million in Series E funding at $2.25 billion valuation led by Exor, a holding company whose portfolio includes Fiat Chrysler. It's a remarkable deal given the currently reduced demand for ride-hailing and public transit.
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